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Pecan Pralines

Pecan Pralines



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These treats are a sweet Texas tradition

Photo courtesy of Debora Smail/Molina’s Cantina

You can whip up a restaurant-quality Texas staple to satisfy your sweet tooth with this easy recipe for pecan pralines. This iconic treat is rooted in both the history of French settlement in Louisiana and Tex-Mex culinary tradition.

Recipe courtesy of Molina's Catina

Notes

You have to work quickly, because the candy will begin to harden and develop a crystalized texture almost immediately. This is a harder, crisper praline.

Ingredients

  • 7 fluid ounces of milk
  • 1 3/4 Cup granulated sugar
  • 3/4 Teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1/2 Cup chopped pecans
  • pinch of cinnamon

New Orleans Pralines

Danielle Centoni is a Portland-based, James Beard Journalism Award-winning food writer and cookbook author whose idea of a perfect day always includes butter, sugar, flour, and an oven.

The Spruce / Stephanie Goldfinger

×
Nutrition Facts
Servings: 15 to 20
Amount per serving
Calories 145
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 7g 9%
Saturated Fat 1g 6%
Cholesterol 3mg 1%
Sodium 10mg 0%
Total Carbohydrate 21g 8%
Dietary Fiber 1g 3%
Total Sugars 20g
Protein 1g
Vitamin C 0mg 1%
Calcium 30mg 2%
Iron 0mg 2%
Potassium 66mg 1%
*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

Pralines are sweet confections made primarily of sugar, nuts, and butter. This hard candy is sometimes ground and used as filling in other candies, but it stands by itself as a delightful treat. Pralines are like a nutty version of fudge with a caramel-like flavor and designed to melt in your mouth, which is why they're so tempting.

In New Orleans, praline is an institution. Brought to Louisiana by French immigrants, the recipe quickly adapted to the plentiful amounts of pecans in Louisiana. Not only were the original almonds and hazelnuts swapped for the local Southern nut, but the recipes that developed also added cream or evaporated milk.

This Southern praline recipe produces sweet, slightly crumbly, brown sugar candies loaded with toasted pecans. It's important that the pecans are well-toasted so they impart maximum flavor and crunch to the candy. But more importantly, use a candy thermometer to make sure the sugar is cooked to the right temperature. Otherwise, you might end up with a gooey mess on your hands.

Click Play to See These New Orleans Pralines Come Together


New Orleans Pralines

Danielle Centoni is a Portland-based, James Beard Journalism Award-winning food writer and cookbook author whose idea of a perfect day always includes butter, sugar, flour, and an oven.

The Spruce / Stephanie Goldfinger

×
Nutrition Facts
Servings: 15 to 20
Amount per serving
Calories 145
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 7g 9%
Saturated Fat 1g 6%
Cholesterol 3mg 1%
Sodium 10mg 0%
Total Carbohydrate 21g 8%
Dietary Fiber 1g 3%
Total Sugars 20g
Protein 1g
Vitamin C 0mg 1%
Calcium 30mg 2%
Iron 0mg 2%
Potassium 66mg 1%
*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

Pralines are sweet confections made primarily of sugar, nuts, and butter. This hard candy is sometimes ground and used as filling in other candies, but it stands by itself as a delightful treat. Pralines are like a nutty version of fudge with a caramel-like flavor and designed to melt in your mouth, which is why they're so tempting.

In New Orleans, praline is an institution. Brought to Louisiana by French immigrants, the recipe quickly adapted to the plentiful amounts of pecans in Louisiana. Not only were the original almonds and hazelnuts swapped for the local Southern nut, but the recipes that developed also added cream or evaporated milk.

This Southern praline recipe produces sweet, slightly crumbly, brown sugar candies loaded with toasted pecans. It's important that the pecans are well-toasted so they impart maximum flavor and crunch to the candy. But more importantly, use a candy thermometer to make sure the sugar is cooked to the right temperature. Otherwise, you might end up with a gooey mess on your hands.

Click Play to See These New Orleans Pralines Come Together


New Orleans Pralines

Danielle Centoni is a Portland-based, James Beard Journalism Award-winning food writer and cookbook author whose idea of a perfect day always includes butter, sugar, flour, and an oven.

The Spruce / Stephanie Goldfinger

×
Nutrition Facts
Servings: 15 to 20
Amount per serving
Calories 145
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 7g 9%
Saturated Fat 1g 6%
Cholesterol 3mg 1%
Sodium 10mg 0%
Total Carbohydrate 21g 8%
Dietary Fiber 1g 3%
Total Sugars 20g
Protein 1g
Vitamin C 0mg 1%
Calcium 30mg 2%
Iron 0mg 2%
Potassium 66mg 1%
*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

Pralines are sweet confections made primarily of sugar, nuts, and butter. This hard candy is sometimes ground and used as filling in other candies, but it stands by itself as a delightful treat. Pralines are like a nutty version of fudge with a caramel-like flavor and designed to melt in your mouth, which is why they're so tempting.

In New Orleans, praline is an institution. Brought to Louisiana by French immigrants, the recipe quickly adapted to the plentiful amounts of pecans in Louisiana. Not only were the original almonds and hazelnuts swapped for the local Southern nut, but the recipes that developed also added cream or evaporated milk.

This Southern praline recipe produces sweet, slightly crumbly, brown sugar candies loaded with toasted pecans. It's important that the pecans are well-toasted so they impart maximum flavor and crunch to the candy. But more importantly, use a candy thermometer to make sure the sugar is cooked to the right temperature. Otherwise, you might end up with a gooey mess on your hands.

Click Play to See These New Orleans Pralines Come Together


New Orleans Pralines

Danielle Centoni is a Portland-based, James Beard Journalism Award-winning food writer and cookbook author whose idea of a perfect day always includes butter, sugar, flour, and an oven.

The Spruce / Stephanie Goldfinger

×
Nutrition Facts
Servings: 15 to 20
Amount per serving
Calories 145
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 7g 9%
Saturated Fat 1g 6%
Cholesterol 3mg 1%
Sodium 10mg 0%
Total Carbohydrate 21g 8%
Dietary Fiber 1g 3%
Total Sugars 20g
Protein 1g
Vitamin C 0mg 1%
Calcium 30mg 2%
Iron 0mg 2%
Potassium 66mg 1%
*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

Pralines are sweet confections made primarily of sugar, nuts, and butter. This hard candy is sometimes ground and used as filling in other candies, but it stands by itself as a delightful treat. Pralines are like a nutty version of fudge with a caramel-like flavor and designed to melt in your mouth, which is why they're so tempting.

In New Orleans, praline is an institution. Brought to Louisiana by French immigrants, the recipe quickly adapted to the plentiful amounts of pecans in Louisiana. Not only were the original almonds and hazelnuts swapped for the local Southern nut, but the recipes that developed also added cream or evaporated milk.

This Southern praline recipe produces sweet, slightly crumbly, brown sugar candies loaded with toasted pecans. It's important that the pecans are well-toasted so they impart maximum flavor and crunch to the candy. But more importantly, use a candy thermometer to make sure the sugar is cooked to the right temperature. Otherwise, you might end up with a gooey mess on your hands.

Click Play to See These New Orleans Pralines Come Together


New Orleans Pralines

Danielle Centoni is a Portland-based, James Beard Journalism Award-winning food writer and cookbook author whose idea of a perfect day always includes butter, sugar, flour, and an oven.

The Spruce / Stephanie Goldfinger

×
Nutrition Facts
Servings: 15 to 20
Amount per serving
Calories 145
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 7g 9%
Saturated Fat 1g 6%
Cholesterol 3mg 1%
Sodium 10mg 0%
Total Carbohydrate 21g 8%
Dietary Fiber 1g 3%
Total Sugars 20g
Protein 1g
Vitamin C 0mg 1%
Calcium 30mg 2%
Iron 0mg 2%
Potassium 66mg 1%
*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

Pralines are sweet confections made primarily of sugar, nuts, and butter. This hard candy is sometimes ground and used as filling in other candies, but it stands by itself as a delightful treat. Pralines are like a nutty version of fudge with a caramel-like flavor and designed to melt in your mouth, which is why they're so tempting.

In New Orleans, praline is an institution. Brought to Louisiana by French immigrants, the recipe quickly adapted to the plentiful amounts of pecans in Louisiana. Not only were the original almonds and hazelnuts swapped for the local Southern nut, but the recipes that developed also added cream or evaporated milk.

This Southern praline recipe produces sweet, slightly crumbly, brown sugar candies loaded with toasted pecans. It's important that the pecans are well-toasted so they impart maximum flavor and crunch to the candy. But more importantly, use a candy thermometer to make sure the sugar is cooked to the right temperature. Otherwise, you might end up with a gooey mess on your hands.

Click Play to See These New Orleans Pralines Come Together


New Orleans Pralines

Danielle Centoni is a Portland-based, James Beard Journalism Award-winning food writer and cookbook author whose idea of a perfect day always includes butter, sugar, flour, and an oven.

The Spruce / Stephanie Goldfinger

×
Nutrition Facts
Servings: 15 to 20
Amount per serving
Calories 145
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 7g 9%
Saturated Fat 1g 6%
Cholesterol 3mg 1%
Sodium 10mg 0%
Total Carbohydrate 21g 8%
Dietary Fiber 1g 3%
Total Sugars 20g
Protein 1g
Vitamin C 0mg 1%
Calcium 30mg 2%
Iron 0mg 2%
Potassium 66mg 1%
*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

Pralines are sweet confections made primarily of sugar, nuts, and butter. This hard candy is sometimes ground and used as filling in other candies, but it stands by itself as a delightful treat. Pralines are like a nutty version of fudge with a caramel-like flavor and designed to melt in your mouth, which is why they're so tempting.

In New Orleans, praline is an institution. Brought to Louisiana by French immigrants, the recipe quickly adapted to the plentiful amounts of pecans in Louisiana. Not only were the original almonds and hazelnuts swapped for the local Southern nut, but the recipes that developed also added cream or evaporated milk.

This Southern praline recipe produces sweet, slightly crumbly, brown sugar candies loaded with toasted pecans. It's important that the pecans are well-toasted so they impart maximum flavor and crunch to the candy. But more importantly, use a candy thermometer to make sure the sugar is cooked to the right temperature. Otherwise, you might end up with a gooey mess on your hands.

Click Play to See These New Orleans Pralines Come Together


New Orleans Pralines

Danielle Centoni is a Portland-based, James Beard Journalism Award-winning food writer and cookbook author whose idea of a perfect day always includes butter, sugar, flour, and an oven.

The Spruce / Stephanie Goldfinger

×
Nutrition Facts
Servings: 15 to 20
Amount per serving
Calories 145
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 7g 9%
Saturated Fat 1g 6%
Cholesterol 3mg 1%
Sodium 10mg 0%
Total Carbohydrate 21g 8%
Dietary Fiber 1g 3%
Total Sugars 20g
Protein 1g
Vitamin C 0mg 1%
Calcium 30mg 2%
Iron 0mg 2%
Potassium 66mg 1%
*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

Pralines are sweet confections made primarily of sugar, nuts, and butter. This hard candy is sometimes ground and used as filling in other candies, but it stands by itself as a delightful treat. Pralines are like a nutty version of fudge with a caramel-like flavor and designed to melt in your mouth, which is why they're so tempting.

In New Orleans, praline is an institution. Brought to Louisiana by French immigrants, the recipe quickly adapted to the plentiful amounts of pecans in Louisiana. Not only were the original almonds and hazelnuts swapped for the local Southern nut, but the recipes that developed also added cream or evaporated milk.

This Southern praline recipe produces sweet, slightly crumbly, brown sugar candies loaded with toasted pecans. It's important that the pecans are well-toasted so they impart maximum flavor and crunch to the candy. But more importantly, use a candy thermometer to make sure the sugar is cooked to the right temperature. Otherwise, you might end up with a gooey mess on your hands.

Click Play to See These New Orleans Pralines Come Together


New Orleans Pralines

Danielle Centoni is a Portland-based, James Beard Journalism Award-winning food writer and cookbook author whose idea of a perfect day always includes butter, sugar, flour, and an oven.

The Spruce / Stephanie Goldfinger

×
Nutrition Facts
Servings: 15 to 20
Amount per serving
Calories 145
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 7g 9%
Saturated Fat 1g 6%
Cholesterol 3mg 1%
Sodium 10mg 0%
Total Carbohydrate 21g 8%
Dietary Fiber 1g 3%
Total Sugars 20g
Protein 1g
Vitamin C 0mg 1%
Calcium 30mg 2%
Iron 0mg 2%
Potassium 66mg 1%
*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

Pralines are sweet confections made primarily of sugar, nuts, and butter. This hard candy is sometimes ground and used as filling in other candies, but it stands by itself as a delightful treat. Pralines are like a nutty version of fudge with a caramel-like flavor and designed to melt in your mouth, which is why they're so tempting.

In New Orleans, praline is an institution. Brought to Louisiana by French immigrants, the recipe quickly adapted to the plentiful amounts of pecans in Louisiana. Not only were the original almonds and hazelnuts swapped for the local Southern nut, but the recipes that developed also added cream or evaporated milk.

This Southern praline recipe produces sweet, slightly crumbly, brown sugar candies loaded with toasted pecans. It's important that the pecans are well-toasted so they impart maximum flavor and crunch to the candy. But more importantly, use a candy thermometer to make sure the sugar is cooked to the right temperature. Otherwise, you might end up with a gooey mess on your hands.

Click Play to See These New Orleans Pralines Come Together


New Orleans Pralines

Danielle Centoni is a Portland-based, James Beard Journalism Award-winning food writer and cookbook author whose idea of a perfect day always includes butter, sugar, flour, and an oven.

The Spruce / Stephanie Goldfinger

×
Nutrition Facts
Servings: 15 to 20
Amount per serving
Calories 145
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 7g 9%
Saturated Fat 1g 6%
Cholesterol 3mg 1%
Sodium 10mg 0%
Total Carbohydrate 21g 8%
Dietary Fiber 1g 3%
Total Sugars 20g
Protein 1g
Vitamin C 0mg 1%
Calcium 30mg 2%
Iron 0mg 2%
Potassium 66mg 1%
*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

Pralines are sweet confections made primarily of sugar, nuts, and butter. This hard candy is sometimes ground and used as filling in other candies, but it stands by itself as a delightful treat. Pralines are like a nutty version of fudge with a caramel-like flavor and designed to melt in your mouth, which is why they're so tempting.

In New Orleans, praline is an institution. Brought to Louisiana by French immigrants, the recipe quickly adapted to the plentiful amounts of pecans in Louisiana. Not only were the original almonds and hazelnuts swapped for the local Southern nut, but the recipes that developed also added cream or evaporated milk.

This Southern praline recipe produces sweet, slightly crumbly, brown sugar candies loaded with toasted pecans. It's important that the pecans are well-toasted so they impart maximum flavor and crunch to the candy. But more importantly, use a candy thermometer to make sure the sugar is cooked to the right temperature. Otherwise, you might end up with a gooey mess on your hands.

Click Play to See These New Orleans Pralines Come Together


New Orleans Pralines

Danielle Centoni is a Portland-based, James Beard Journalism Award-winning food writer and cookbook author whose idea of a perfect day always includes butter, sugar, flour, and an oven.

The Spruce / Stephanie Goldfinger

×
Nutrition Facts
Servings: 15 to 20
Amount per serving
Calories 145
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 7g 9%
Saturated Fat 1g 6%
Cholesterol 3mg 1%
Sodium 10mg 0%
Total Carbohydrate 21g 8%
Dietary Fiber 1g 3%
Total Sugars 20g
Protein 1g
Vitamin C 0mg 1%
Calcium 30mg 2%
Iron 0mg 2%
Potassium 66mg 1%
*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

Pralines are sweet confections made primarily of sugar, nuts, and butter. This hard candy is sometimes ground and used as filling in other candies, but it stands by itself as a delightful treat. Pralines are like a nutty version of fudge with a caramel-like flavor and designed to melt in your mouth, which is why they're so tempting.

In New Orleans, praline is an institution. Brought to Louisiana by French immigrants, the recipe quickly adapted to the plentiful amounts of pecans in Louisiana. Not only were the original almonds and hazelnuts swapped for the local Southern nut, but the recipes that developed also added cream or evaporated milk.

This Southern praline recipe produces sweet, slightly crumbly, brown sugar candies loaded with toasted pecans. It's important that the pecans are well-toasted so they impart maximum flavor and crunch to the candy. But more importantly, use a candy thermometer to make sure the sugar is cooked to the right temperature. Otherwise, you might end up with a gooey mess on your hands.

Click Play to See These New Orleans Pralines Come Together


Watch the video: Karamell Pralinen. Rezepte aus der Berliner Kaffeerösterei Manufaktur (August 2022).