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Best Egg Foo Yung recipe

Best Egg Foo Yung recipe



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Create your own Chinese takeaway at home with this easy and delicious recipe. The Egg foo young sauce is simple and flavourful.

217 people made this

IngredientsServes: 5

  • 8 eggs, beaten
  • 2 sticks celery, thinly sliced
  • 2 onions, finely chopped
  • 70g beansprouts
  • 35g diced fresh mushrooms
  • 50g chopped cooked chicken breast
  • 75g cooked and crumbled minced beef
  • 70g chopped cooked pork
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • Sauce
  • 2 chicken stock cubes
  • 350ml hot water
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons sugar
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 6 tablespoons cold water
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons cornflour

MethodPrep:5min ›Cook:25min ›Ready in:30min

  1. Beat eggs in a large bowl. Add the celery, onion, beansprouts, mushrooms, chicken, beef, pork, salt and pepper. Mix together.
  2. Heat oil in a medium frying pan or wok and brown egg mixture, a ladleful at a time. When all of the mixture is browned, set aside.
  3. To Make Sauce: Dissolve the stock cubes in the hot water in a small saucepan; add sugar and soy sauce and blend well over medium heat. Add cold water and cornflour and stir until thick and smooth. Serve with Egg Foo Yung.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(202)

Reviews in English (165)

I'm a vegetarian, but use this recipe as a base by substituting the meat for Tofu or Quorn, and the chicken stock for vegetable stock. It makes a gorgeous dish which is thoroughly enjoyed by all 9 of my family!-24 Oct 2011

by Becky

Fabulous! We loved it. Was quick, easy and delicious. I didn't have any leftover meat, so I bought some "wafer-thin" (1/4 inch) boneless center cut pork chops. Marinated them for a little while in soy sauce, then seared them with a bit of oil. Took only minutes to cook. Chopped them up and proceeded with the egg foo yung recipe. I used an omelet pan with just a splash of oil, cooking one serving at a time. Cooked til golden brown, turned, browned the other side, and then kept them warm on in the oven while I cooked the rest. The patties cook very quickly so it didn't take long. The sauce is simple and perfect for this dish. Was a bit thin, so I added a little more cornstarch to thicken. Sprinkle a bit of chopped green onion on top for garnish. I served this dish with steamed rice, store-bought spring rolls, and Chinese Cabbage Salad II (recipe on this website). A wonderful, satisfying and healthy meal!-31 Jan 2006

by ISORTGAMMM

I am so glad I found this recipe. The egg foo yung came out exactly like they do at my local place. I added some powdered ginger, I think it gave the recipe some added mppphhh:.) I also used canned bean sprouts. You can make this recipe using canned or fresh ingredients, or a combo of the two. The first time I made this I made them vegetarian because I lacked some of the other ingredients. All the times they have tasted great. The great thing about this recipe is that you can expand on it and make it your own. I have tried shrimp, chicken, and beef egg foo yung. When I placed the batter in the pan, the ingredients beside the egg did stay just in the middle. It wasn't a problem though. I just spread the ingredients. Whether you choose to use the amount of called for ingredients or just veggie, etc., the amount of spices, etc. can stay the same. The sauce was good. It was simple. Same as the egg foo yung, it can be expanded on. Using fresh chicken stock, etc.-27 Dec 2004


How to make Egg Foo Young

Egg Foo Young 芙蓉蛋 is an authentic Cantonese egg cuisine. Since it looks like a western-style omelet, those who are unfamiliar with it will mistakenly cook it the way of making an omelet. In fact, they are originated from two sides of the world and created in an entirely different way. This article will highlight all the important aspects of making Egg Foo Young and provides an authentic Egg Foo Young recipe on how to prepare it at home.

The Legend

Legend has it Egg Foo Young was invented by the scholar 朱善祥 in the Ching Dynasty in the 18th century. One day, when he worked at the province of Yunnan, he was attracted by a local egg delicacy. The scholar loved to eat it so much and described the look of the egg dishes resemble the beautiful lotus flower (芙蓉). When he was back to Zhenjiang, he improvised the dish and eventually popularized in Guangdong. He called it as &lsquolotus egg&rsquo (Foo Young means lotus in Chinese), and the name got stuck with it until today.

Nowadays Egg Foo Yong is considered a traditional Cantonese cuisine, with hundreds of variations created. The unique one is the American Chinese puffed omelet that serves along with brown gravy. This Cantonese hybrid dish is found in most of the Chinese restaurants in America.

There are many different translations of the word 芙蓉蛋. Egg foo young, Egg fu yung, egg foo yung, fu yong egg, and fu rong egg are the common translations.

Note: This post may contain affiliate links. Please read my disclosure for more info. I may receive commissions for purchases made through links in this post.


Directions

For the pancakes

Combine all ingredients except the oil in a large bowl and toss to combine.

Heat 2 teaspoon of oil in small skillet or wok over medium-high heat, just before it begins to smoke, and add 1/4 of the ingredients to the pan.

Cook until the egg mixture sets enough to enable you to flip it over and continue to cook until the second side is set and lightly browned.

Move to a baking sheet and place in a warm oven while you repeat procedure making three more pancakes with remaining ingredients, adding more oil to pan between each cake.

(Do not stack on top of each other, but place individually on the baking sheet.)

For the sauce

In a small pan, combine broth, marmalade, sugar and vinegar heat over medium heat.

In a small bowl, mix water and cornstarch until completely dissolved.

Add to sauce pan, cooking and stirring until the sauce thickens and bubbles.


PRO TIPS

  • TIP #1: Do not use too much vegetables as your egg patties may taste somewhat “watery”. Vegetables need to be very finely sliced (julienned) because they have to be cooked in a very short amount of time.
  • TIP #2: The role of cornstarch and water slurry and oil added to eggs is to prevent them from drying out.

Serve Beef Egg Foo Young smothered with thick gravy and topped with some sliced scallions. A side dish of cooked rice can be added as well.


The Egg Foo Young Formula

Egg Foo Young can be made with almost any vegetables and proteins because it’s a recipe that evolved as a way to use up leftovers. Use:

2 cups of Add Ins for every 6 eggs.

Add Ins being cooked proteins, raw shrimp/prawns, fish, mince/ground meat and vegetables.

Prawn/shrimp and pork are the two most common versions on restaurant menus so I’m sharing both of these today.

Any raw vegetables that are finely chopped enough to cook through in a few minutes in the omelette are ideal here. If using vegetables that will take longer to cook, for example, diced zucchini, then sauté first in a little oil and perhaps garlic for extra flavour, then add to the batter.


Most people probably don’t know that egg foo young is deep fried, since many recipes simply use a cast iron skillet or frying pan.

This egg foo young recipe uses the very classic takeout restaurant method of deep frying the patties, which not only creates that authentic taste, it actually makes the egg foo young pancakes a bit lighter and speeds up cooking time.

I know that sounds a little counter-intuitive, but when fried in oil at the right temperature range between 330-350F, the egg foo young omelettes or pancakes actually come out perfectly fluffy. Again, oil temperature is very important to ensure your chicken egg foo young is not too greasy, so be sure you prepare your frying oil carefully!

Aside from lightness and speed of preparation, Chinese restaurants also use this deep fry method to fry the onions in the mixture, which makes the dish even more fragrant and flavorful.

Once you add the gravy, garnish with fresh scallions and sesame seeds, and eat this over rice, you’ll know why the restaurants do it the way they do!

So now for some inevitable questions and answers.


Egg Foo Yung

In a medium bowl, beat the eggs with water and soy sauce.

Step 2

Stir in bean sprouts, mushrooms and green onions mix well

Step 3

Spray an 8" skillet with cooking spray and heat over medium heat.

Step 4

Pour in approximately one fourth of the egg mixture.

Step 5

As the mixture sets at the edges, with spatula, gently lift cooked portion to allow uncooked egg portion to flow underneath.

Step 6

Cook until bottom is set and beginning to brown, and top is almost set, then slide onto plate.

Step 7

Flip over (uncooked side down) back into skillet and cook until eggs are done in the middle, about 1 - 2 minutes.

Step 8

Slide onto serving plate and keep warm in a low oven while making the rest.

Step 9

Repeat procedure for remaining omelettes.

Step 10

Serve with warm Asian Sauce

Step 11

Combine all sauce ingredients in a small saucepan and heat to a boil, stirring constantly.


Egg Foo Yung Recipe


One of the consequences of my cooking 1970s Asian American food from James Beard’s classic cookbook, American Cookery, is that I developed a fondness for egg foo yung. I never thought I’d type those words.

Without doubt, egg foo yung has been changed many ways in America. Despite its Cantonese name, it is a dish from Shanghai. During my research, I found many recipes and realized that egg foo yung didn’t have to be the unattractive Chinese-American restaurant version that’s covered in gloppy brown sauce.

On the contrary, egg foo yung is an easy, versatile food that you can adapt pretty much however you want. For example, vary the protein (shrimp, pork, or chicken) or go vegetarian with shiitake mushroom. Serve it hot or warm with or without a thickened sauce. I like a simple dunk in soy sauce with fresh chiles chile garlic sauce and Sriracha would be excellent too. Ketchup, particularly the spicy umami ketchup, is fun for a sweet tang!

Play with egg foo yung but keep this consistent: fry it in a decent amount of oil to create great crisp frilled edges. You want the skillet to bubble away like this:


What to do with leftover egg foo yung? I’ve eaten it cold straight from fridge and turned it into a classic St. Paul sandwich, which is a Chinese American specialty in the Midwest. I’ve even made egg foo yung banh mi, which is not the same as banh mi op la (sunny side up eggs, drizzled with Maggi seasoning sauce and eaten with baguette).

Egg Foo Yung

Adding flour to the stir-fried mixture prevents the vegetables from getting weepy. It also lends body to the eggs.

Makes about 8 pancakes, to serve 4

About 4 tablespoons canola or peanut oil
2 scallions, white and green parts, chopped
3/4 cup chopped raw shrimp, rehydrated shiitake mushroom, char siu pork, or leftover roast chicken
1/4 cup chopped water chestnut
1/4 cup finely chopped celery or bamboo shoot
2 cups bean sprouts
1 1/2 tablespoons light (regular) soy sauce, plus more for dipping
1 to 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour (use more for a firmer texture)
1/8 teaspoon ground black or white pepper
5 large eggs
1 or 2 thinly sliced Thai or Serrano chiles, chile garlic sauce, or Sriracha chile sauce

1. Heat 1 tablespoons of oil in a medium skillet. Add the scallion and cook for about 15 seconds, or until aromatic. Add the shrimp, water chestnut, and celery. Cook for about 45 seconds, until aromatic.

Add the bean sprouts and cook for about 2 minutes, until slightly softened. Add the soy sauce and cook for about 1 minute, until the bean sprouts have wilted. Sprinkle on the flour and stir to combine. Cook, stirring, for about 30 seconds, until the mixture coheres. Set aside to cool for about 5 minutes.

2. In a bowl, beat the eggs. Add the cooked mixture and combine well.

3. Pour enough oil to film the bottom of a medium or large skillet. Heat over medium-high heat. Ladle about 1/4 cup of the egg mixture to form 4-inch-wide pancakes. Gently fry for 1 to 2 minutes per side, until golden brown. Between batches, replenish the oil and adjust the heat to prevent burning. Serve hot or warm with soy sauce and chiles or chile sauce.


Ready? Let's cook!

Crack eggs into a bowl and beat.

Add into the egg the beansprouts, peas, chicken slices, salt and white pepper and mix together.

Heat 2 tbsp vegetable oil on high heat in wok.

When oil is hot add the egg mixture to the pan and keep moving the mixture around for 1 minute whilst the mix is still wet. As it starts to cook and take it's shape then leave it.

Cook for 1 minute, flip it, cook for further 1 minute. Keep the omelette moving by shaking the pan so it slides around and you know it isn’t sticking.

Serve and garnish with the sliced spring onions.

Extra Notes: Depending on the size of your wok or pan it's definitely better to cook this as an individual serving for 1 person. If you need to cook for 2 just double the ingredients etc. It will take longer to cook the egg when there is more mixture.


Egg Foo Yung

In a medium bowl, beat the eggs with water and soy sauce.

Step 2

Stir in bean sprouts, mushrooms and green onions mix well

Step 3

Spray an 8" skillet with cooking spray and heat over medium heat.

Step 4

Pour in approximately one fourth of the egg mixture.

Step 5

As the mixture sets at the edges, with spatula, gently lift cooked portion to allow uncooked egg portion to flow underneath.

Step 6

Cook until bottom is set and beginning to brown, and top is almost set, then slide onto plate.

Step 7

Flip over (uncooked side down) back into skillet and cook until eggs are done in the middle, about 1 - 2 minutes.

Step 8

Slide onto serving plate and keep warm in a low oven while making the rest.

Step 9

Repeat procedure for remaining omelettes.

Step 10

Serve with warm Asian Sauce

Step 11

Combine all sauce ingredients in a small saucepan and heat to a boil, stirring constantly.


Egg Foo Yung

Egg Foo Yung, photo courtesy of the Jacques Pepin Foundation, click to become a member.

In my book, From Scratch: 10 Meals, 175 Recipes, I wanted to show how much we can learn when we learn a basic dish. This following Egg Foo Yung is from The Omelet chapter. The egg is the most versatile ingredient on the planet.

I want to extend the notion of omelets and scrambled eggs beyond their customary forms by including this excellent use of blended eggs cooked in a pan. Once you recognize that you can put more than chives and cheese in eggs, there seems to be little that won’t work this way. Here meat and vegetables are blended into the mix to create this classic Chinese-American dish, Egg Foo Yung.

I have a deep love of the Chinese-American food I ate growing up in Cleveland in the 1970s: diced meat battered, fried, then stir-fried in a sticky sweet-sour sauce, fried noodle dishes, big fat egg rolls with a thick blistered wrapper, chicken with cashews, and fiery kung pao chicken.

When the Jacques Pépin Foundation asked me to film a demo to help them raise money for their foundation, I wanted to honor his love of the omelet but also to do a recipe that was a little out of the ordinary, and chose this. (Become a member to get access two giant video cookbooks filled with demos by the countries best chefs. It's a great organization.)

What the dish is.

Egg foo yong, an elaborate egg pancake served with a savory sauce, is this kind of classic—the quintessential Chinese-American dish, as it appears to have been created by Cantonese cooks who had immigrated to the United States’ West Coast in the mid-nineteenth century. It got a bad name by the time it had become a staple in mediocre Chinese restaurants, but it deserves a wider audience, even a routine spot in your repertoire of dishes to prepare for friends. It’s just elaborate enough to merit dinner-party treatment, but it’s easy and can be prepared ahead of time.

I also love it for what it has to say about the egg—that the egg makes an ideal framework, as it were, for other ingredients and flavors. The neutral egg here takes on deep notes of oyster sauce and soy sauce, sharpened by a bit of rice vinegar. It’s loaded with chopped vegetables and meat (I prefer a mixture of pork and chicken), which is really what it’s all about. The egg is just there to hold everything together—egg foo yong is like a fritter in that respect—and the addition of cornstarch allows the eggs to form distinct pancakes.

The sauce was originally simply chicken stock seasoned with soy sauce and thickened with cornstarch (see James Beard’s recipe in his classic American Cookery). But because the sauce is so prominent, it’s worth giving it a little more love with aromatics. It’s extraordinarily good if you use your own stock, but don’t not make this dish just because you don’t have homemade stock.

Finishing the Egg Foo Yung.

Eggs generally hold well, so these pancakes can be cooked and kept warm in a low oven for an hour or two without losing any of their deliciousness. (You can even refrigerate them and then microwave them—not perfect, but not bad either!)

This is a deeply satisfying and nourishing, dish. I prefer it served over rice to make a more substantial meal, but there’s no reason you couldn’t serve it with the sauce alone. Or you could even make mini pancakes and serve them with the sauce for dipping.

This dish is heavy on the mise en place. It's best to make the sauce the day before, or earlier, then make the egg pancakes.